News | CRISPR, crispr genome editing system - Part 11
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CRISPR Mouse Service in Creative Animodel Accomplishes Conditional Knock-in

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Researchers from the Creative Animodel Institute use CRISPR/Cas genetic regulatory system, manipulating mouse genome with one step into the reporter gene and the conditional allele. Now we just need several weeks rather than a few years time to generate such a complex engineering allele animals and also to construct models of disease or to research gene function using these animals. Creative Animodel Institute said: “We have previously used CRISPR/Cas to mutate gene, but it can not predict the characteristics of these targeted mutations. Now we can define the specificity deletion by two times cutting. We can generate conditional mice one step, easily and very effectively insert DNA fragments of up to 3000 base pairs. In the past, however, we need...
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Genome Editing Spy Style: Self-destructing DNA with CRISPR

Have you ever watched a spy move and felt yourself craving spy gadgets, such as explosive chewing gum, or a tricked out Aston Martin? Well if you are a genome-engineering scientist you can now get your very own spy gadget – self-destructing DNA! But this cool creation isn’t just to fulfill your 007 dreams, it solves two very real issues: environmental spillover of foreign genetic material and protection of intellectual property. Minimizing spillover is important to help prevent unintended effects of targeted genome editors on surrounding cells. Sadly, traditional DNA removal techniques are quite tedious, time consuming, and expensive to construct. Brian Caliando and Christopher Voigt of MIT decided to tackle this issue by employing the famed CRISPR system to...
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Crispr: is it a good idea to ‘upgrade’ our DNA?

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Last year Tony Perry made mice that would have been brown-furred grow up white instead. That Perry, a molecular embryologist at the University of Bath, tweaked their coat colour isn’t new – scientists have been making so-called knock-out mice, in which certain genes are disabled, since the technique was invented in 1989. It is a long and cumbersome procedure that involves combining pieces of DNA in embryonic stem cells and mouse breeding. But Perry, who published his study in December, didn’t use this method. Instead he used a new genome-editing technology that has been taking the scientific world by storm since it was first developed from the bacterial immune system in 2012, and shown to work in human cells in 2013....
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CRISPR Gets Lit Up and Tuned

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By now, most within the biomedical fields have likely at least heard mention of the gene-editing tool known as CRISPR/Cas9. Since 2013, this technique has created a veritable revolution within the disciplines of molecular biology and genetics and is already showing tremendous promise for treating such diseases a cystic fibrosis and sickle cycle, as well as being able to generate new animal models that better mimic human disease. The power of the CRISPR/Cas9 system lies not only in its powerful editing capabilities, but also its speed, simplicity, and compatibility for use within most organisms. However, there is one main drawback for which scientists at the University of Pittsburgh and University of North Carolina believe they may have just found a...
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Using CRISPR, biologists find a way to comprehensively identify anti-cancer drug targets

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Cold Spring Harbor, NY – Imagine having a complete catalog of the best drug targets to hit in a particularly deadly form of cancer. Imagine having a master catalog of such targets for all the major cancer types and subtypes. Scientists at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) today publish in Nature Biotechnology a method of compiling just such a catalog, using the revolutionary gene-editing technology called CRISPR. CRISPR enables biologists to manipulate the genetic material of cells with unprecedented precision and ease – letter by DNA letter. CSHL Assistant Professor Chris Vakoc, M.D., Ph.D., and Junwei Shi, a Ph.D. student investigator in his lab, have figured out how to harness CRISPR’s elegant power to the task that preoccupies their lab...
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A CRISPR Look at Genome Editing

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New Tools Are Driving Science even Further Ahead with the Ability to Interrogate the Function of any DNA Sequence in almost any Animal Model Andrea Toell, Ph.D. Genome editing techniques have taken a giant leap forwards since the development of recombinant DNA technology back in the 1970s. The ability to manipulate DNA revolutionized the field of biology, allowing researchers to study genes in hitherto unknown levels of detail, teasing out a greater functional understanding. More recently, new genome editing tools are driving science even further ahead with the ability to interrogate the function of any DNA sequence in almost any animal model, in situ, i.e., directly within the genome. The ability to examine gene function and organization within their endogenous...
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Could CRISPR be the Magic Bullet?

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You Can Be “On Target” and Still Fail to Win a Prize. MaryAnn Labant. Research scientists and tool suppliers in the life sciences continue to devote resources to CRISPR, which is still a relatively new tool. Much is still unknown, and the community needs a deeper understanding of the technology to better harness CRISPR for discovery and development as well as eventual clinical applications. [Thermo Fisher Scientific] The research community’s rapid acceptance of theCRISPR/Cas technology is propelling a stage of deep investment in technology development. Already, three companies have emerged focusing on CRISPR therapeutic applications: Intellia Therapeutics, Editas Medicine, and CRISPR Therapeutics. To continue to move the technology forward, scientists recently converged at the CRISPR Precision Gene EditingCongress to discuss unmet...
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The patent fight over the next generation genome targeting tool – the CRISPR genes

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The development of efficient and reliable ways to make precise, targeted changes to the genome of living cells is a long-standing goal for biomedical researchers. Recently, a new tool based on a bacterial CRISPR-associated protein-9 nuclease (Cas9) from the bacteria Streptococcus pyogenes has induced considerable excitement both as a research tool and for its possible commercial utilizations. The functions of CRISPR (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats) and CRISPR-associated (Cas) genes are essential in adaptive immunity in select bacteria, enabling the organisms to respond to and eliminate invading genetic material.  Thus, the possibilities for this new tool is enormous as one continue to characterize the tool and develop usages. This new technology/tool is set to become a patent battleground as...
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CRISPR germline editing reverberates through biotech community

The organizers of a recent meeting in Napa, California, to consider the broad societal implications of clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) genome editing have succeeded in their primary goal of stimulating public debate on the ethical issues raised by the technology. Although the event, held on January 24, took place behind closed doors, a subsequent commentary from its leading participants—plus two influential non-attendees, George Church of Harvard Medical School in Boston, and Martin Jinek of the University of Zurich—prompted widespread media coverage (Science 348, 36–38, 2015). The group has called for a broadly based discussion of the potential merits and risks of the technology and a global moratorium on germline applications, until such time, if ever, responsible uses...
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7 Gene Editing Companies Investors Should Watch

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7 Gene Editing Companies Investors Should Watch – Nanalyze A gene editing technology called CRISPR has been called “The Biggest Biotech Discovery of the Century” by the MIT Technology Review and Forbes magazine has said that this technology could change biotech forever. Some surprising news came out of China this week, when it was announced that Chinese scientists had utilized CRISPR to alter the DNA of human embryos. The experiment attempted to modify a gene in human embryos that causes a fatal blood disorder. This change would then go on to alter the DNA of every cell so any changes made could then be passed on from generation to generation. The ethical considerations immediately came front and center with talks of what guidelines...
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